Django Unchained: Reviewed

I’m fairly certain that “Django Unchained” is one of the best, craziest, most shocking, bizarre, and wildly entertaining movies I’ve ever seen.  And now that I’ve had a full twelve hours to digest it, I’m still not quite sure how to describe what I saw.

Even if I didn’t know that Quentin Tarantino had directed it, I would have figured it out within fifteen minutes.  Tarantino loves to cross lines and to turn taboo subjects into almost comical fodder.

“Django Unchained,” in large part, deals with slavery in America in 1858.  Jamie Foxx is excellent as the freed slave, Django.  And Christoph Waltz will probably win an Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his effort as Django’s partner and mentor as bounty hunters.  Also appearing in the star laden cast is Samuel L. Jackson and Leonardo DiCaprio.  And of course, Tarentino provides a cameo.

The white elephant in the room concerning this movie is its use of the N-word.  110 times to be exact.  I’m not going to lie, it’s aggressive.  And like most Tarentino movies, it’s exaggerated.  But somehow, he’s able to poke fun at some of the strangest things.

So, if you go, brace yourself.  For a lot of action and for a three hour movie that somehow doesn’t feel like three hours.

True Story:  Have you ever gone to a movie and when you’re buying your ticket you momentarily forget what the movie is called?  It happens to me about 25% of the time.  And it happened last night.  My mind raced as I frantically searched for the title on the sign.  After three seconds I blurted out, “Durango Unchanged.”  The kid behind the counter, to his credit, nodded and smiled one of those smart-aleck type smiles.  Wink.  I’m sure he told his work friends about it as soon as I walked out of earshot.  On the tough streets of Stephen, if you made a mistake similar to that, we referred to it is as a “Richy.”

Django Unchained

4 out of 5 stars.

No popcorn, no pop.  Although, after two hours I was mad with that decision.